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Sunday, March 16, 2014

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Irene Hogan

I discovered your podcasts about a year ago. I listen to them while travelling each day along a windy country road in Australia, while driving my disabled son to his special school. They are my saviour. I was so surprised to see I'd caught up, and now can only listen to one a week, or less at times.

I love these podcasts. Not only are they so informative ( I keep my daughter up to date each day by telling her which King I am up to), but you tell the story in such an engaging manner, not reading a text in a boring monotone as many pod casters do. Please keep it up. I am looking forward to having the confused War of the Roses explained.

Rob Shinnick

Re. the "king's evil/touching for scrofula" thing, what was that all about? I must've missed the earlier reference(s) to it. But as a numismatist, I've heard it discussed in connection with holed coins, which are often called "touch pieces". (I suppose Wikipedia will assist me with more about scrofula, though I'm almost scared to look- just the word itself sounds rather unpleasant.)

Rob Shinnick

Went to Wikipedia to look up scrofula.

Yep. Eew. Ickie-poo.

So glad to have been born in the 20th century and be living in the 21st.

(Antibiotics and all that stuff, yay. Just finished a second round of 'em, in fact, for my stubborn bronchitis.)

Rob Shinnick

... but Wikipedia answered my question about the numismatic tie-in with the "King's Evil".

Yay, Wikipedia.

Proceed!

Eileen

Hi David,

I am quickly approaching that dreaded time when I will catch up with the current episodes (for the 2nd time) since I will no longer be able to binge on your podcast. I say for the 2nd time because when you got to Poitiers last December, I found myself thoroughly confused and didn't want to go forward without really understanding. I lay the blame for my confusion not at your door, but with my then concurrent immersion in at least 5 different time periods of English history: your most magnificent podcast, Revolutions podcast, the Britsh History podcast, the History of English podcast, and reading Bernard Cornwall's The Last Kingdom. The final blow was a nasty cold that started in late November and I just couldn't get a grasp on Edward III!

So, I finished the book, Revolutions moved on to the Americas, I let the other podcasts accumulate for a while so I could start your podcast all over again. I am so, so glad that I did. I love the Anglo-Saxons the best, so it was fun to rub shoulders with them again. Binge listening has its pros and cons. For episodes I had remembered, it was great since I could listen to several in a row and my understanding was strengthened. Now that I am at the start of the 100 years war again, I find myself rewinding quite a bit. My mind does tend to wander sometimes (e.g., what does David look like; I never could pick him out in that travel video his daughter made; will he ever start doing tours a la Mike Duncan, etc.), so I miss the odd detail or fact. Luckily, my golden retriever needs a lot of walking so I get to listen to podcasts, esp. yours, quite a bit.

So, in the end, I just wanted to let you now that I am one of the legion of delighted fans of your podcast. Your delivery and humor make history quite engaging. Keep up the good work.

BTW, I recently left a review on the US iTunes site under the name Crazy Dog Walker.

The History of England

Irene - what a lovely thought! I shall accompany you down the roads of Australia hopefully for as long as you care to listen.

The History of England

Rob, yup, as you say, with a touch of Scrofula I imagine you would take pretty much any available route to be rid of it...

The History of England

Hi Eileen, and lovely to hear from you! sorry it gets confusing - it's a problem. I am most impressive that you have gone over it all again. Thanks so much for the iTunes comments - I do so love getting comments here and on iTunes, it makes a real difference.

alys blakeway

I particularly like your interest in constitutional history, and your sense that, from an early date, the people of England felt they were entitled to (even if they didn't get it) redress for unfair treatment. When we get to the C17 I can tell you an interesting example from the Manor of Merdon. (The people won!)
Do you think that when QE1 said "Know ye not I am Richard II" she was referring to the fact that poor,silly Essex "was" Bolingbroke and staged R2 to make a point? Though I don't think he got quite the reaction he'd been hoping for! See http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/8636

Dave

For someone who claims to hate Shakespeare, you've now made the unusual choice of making references to Richard the Second, Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, and Cymbeline.

I look forward to your take on the messiness to come.

The History of England

Alys, yes, I think you could be very right. Very good t see the reference to the National Biography, which I use through the Library system a lot.

And David, yes, it's a 'mare, is it you? You just can't get away from the bloke!

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